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Safety First..... Tips, Reminders & Maintenance

Print These Pages For Check Lists

DON’T LEAVE WITHOUT IT!

Spare Tire

Jack

Tire Iron

3 Emergency Triangles

Flares

Chocks

Flashlight

Electrical Tape and Duct Tape

Knife for Cutting Ropes in an Emergency

Plenty of Food and Water

Buckets & Sponge

Spare Halters and Heavy Duty Lead Ropes

Spare Bulbs

Spare Fuses if Applicable

Fire Extinguisher

WD-40 or other Lubricant

Broom

Shovel

Pitchfork

Manure Disposal Bags

Insect Spray (Bees & Wasps)

First Aid Kit for your Horse which Includes among other Things (Check With Your Vet For Additional Medications):

- Vet Wrap

- Cotton

- Gauze

- Peroxide & Rubbing Alcohol

- Ace Granules or Liquid

- Bute

- Banamine

  • Standard First Aid Kit for Yourself

During Winter Months (in addition):

Sand

Red Flag (For Antenna if Stranded)

Horse & Human Blankets

Candles

Matches or Lighter

Tire Chains

For The Tow Vehicle:

Registration for the Vehicle and Trailer

Proof of Insurance

Jumper Cables

Tool Kit, Including Wiring Materials

Spare Belts & Hoses

Tow Chain

Cellular Phone or CB Radio

Road Atlas

Work Gloves

Portable Air Compressor

Cash & Credit Card

For Crossing State Lines:

Certificate of Inspection (Health Certificate)

Proof of Negative Coggins Veterinary Test (Equine Infectious Anemia)

Other:___________________________________

Other:___________________________________

Other:___________________________________

Other:___________________________________

HORSE COMFORT

When hauling your horses in a stock trailer with open slats at the top make sure to put a fly mask on to protect your horses eyes. Trailer air flow will vacuum in the trailer making it possible for dangerous road debris to enter your trailer causing serious damage to their eyes.

If using hay nets, make sure they do not hang too low! I recommend feed bags. If you use hay nets, try using a large double end snap. As the feed goes down you can take up the slack with the snap and don’t have to worry about the knot slipping!

Make sure that your horse head ties are so that if you’re hauling more than one horse they can’t reach each other and start a fight while in the trailer.

Make sure that in hot weather (over 80 degrees) that your horse has plenty of ventilation. Open all windows and remove storm doors if heat is excessive. Horses produce a lot of heat, especially when they’re nervous. If a horse gets heat stroke, the consequences can be severe. Take this seriously.

If the weather is damp or chilly, make sure that your horse does not have direct wind on them. Make sure there is some vacuum ventilation to avoid unusual condensation. Try sliding your rump windows open 3-4 inches.

If the weather is cold, blanket & hood your horse. If your horse is excessively sweaty, this probably means that it is not cold enough for heavy blankets. Try a sheet to avoid drafts. Slight ventilation is still necessary.

If you have any questions or concerns whatsoever, please feel free to contact me at your convenience. There are no foolish questions. I am more than happy to share some advice with you.

BEFORE YOU HEAD OUT.....

on your next trip with your trailer, use the following checklist to make sure your trip will be a safe one:

Do not let anyone that is unfamiliar with your trailer hook it up for you!

Inspect the tires and all fluid levels on the tow vehicle to ensure it will safely tow the trailer.

Check the ball on bumper hitch or on gooseneck plate for tightness, security and proper fit. Grease inside of ball coupling periodically for lubrication.

Check coupler on trailer to make sure it is locked into closed position on the ball.

Connect and check security of safety chains or cables. Always cross your safety chains.

Plug in the electrical connector on the trailer to the tow vehicle.

Check the electrical connection between the trailer and the tow vehicle and that the coupler is securely locked onto the tow vehicle.

Check operation of all lights and the brake system. Some trailers have a “ball ground” if your not successful getting your lights on & you have double checked that you are properly plugged in, then try moving your vehicle back & forth 20-30 feet to establish a good ground.

Inspect tires for proper inflation, adequate tread, and even wear.

Check that the spare tire is the correct size and properly inflated.

Check that all lug nuts are tight.

Inspect the floor for weak spots.

Inspect security and strength of all tie rings and trailer ties.

Adjust roof vents and windows for proper ventilation.

Check all partitions and posts to ensure they are pinned or fastened in place.

Open escape doors to allow quick exit while loading.

              Put all breast and butt bars in place and close and secure all doors.

DRIVING TIPS

Do not be intimidated by your trailer! It just takes a little common sense & some extra caution.

Always load your horse on the drivers side of a straight load trailer. If hauling two horses, put the larger horse on the drivers side. This will allow for proper weight distribution for road crowning.

Make sure all door latches are slammed tight! Never drive loaded or empty with the interior partitions or bars hanging or disconnected.

Always allow proper stopping and turning distance. Stop and turn very slowly & smoothly. Use your own judgment for speed on good roads & highways.

When traveling loaded on bumpy roads or uneven surfaces: Reduce speed, avoid sudden jerks in the wheel and avoid swaying.

Watch all of your mirrors frequently. Know who is around you at all times. When passing others, watch your mirrors, look over your shoulder, and pull into passing lane smoothly.

If you have never hauled before, set up a time with Will to guide you through the process. We have a 40 acre field to practice in and can get you some experience before heading out on your own!

MAINTENANCE TIPS!

Always make sure tires are inflated to proper pressure and lug nuts are tight! Pressure requirements are stated on the side of the tire.

Have respect for your trailer. Wash it frequently! Use a mild detergent recommended for automobile paint finishes. Make sure to rinse thoroughly! Do not use a pressure washer.

If you want to keep a nice shine & minimize rust on steel, then you need to wax your new trailer often. Every couple of months in the spring & summer is recommended. Also wax in the winter if you’re using your trailer often. We recommend Turtle Wax designed for automobile paint and hand buffing. Make sure to wax all plastic, chrome and wheels to avoid discoloration.

Never cover your trailer with a tarp touching the roof. This procedure traps condensation and will do more harm than good. This will void any paint warranty!

Try to park your trailer in the shade if possible, but not under any trees with sap or dead branches. A garage is recommended, but we realize that is not always possible.

If your painted steel surface gets scratched or chipped, make sure to use touch-up paint immediately to prevent rusting.

Always make sure to have about 4-6 inches of fresh sawdust or shavings on the floor area of your trailer when loaded. This will help prevent urine from spraying on your horses legs and the trailer walls.

Clean your trailer out every time you use it! Wash down the walls and floors if they became wet. Remove mats & let air dry. This will provide a much longer life to your interior.

Make sure your axle bearings are always lubed. Check after the first 150 miles of use. It is recommended that you check the grease about every 1000 miles and have them re-packed every 8,000 miles or every spring under normal usage. Call us for full service annually.

Keep all hinges lubricated. Carry a can of WD-40. It works miracles.

Your trailer will provide a much greater trade or resale value, and retain its looks if you maintain it like you would your vehicle.

Home    About Us    Parts & Warranty    Hours & Directions        Financing    Towing & Safety Tips    Web Deals Sign Up

NEW ARRIVALS PAGE!    Consignments    Clearance & Bank Repo's    Pre-Owned Trailers     FLORIDA TRAILERS

Valley Trailers     Homesteader Trailers    Hawk Trailers     Lakota Aluminum Trailers     Lakota Living Quarters

Cargo, Auto, Bike & Utility Trailers    Real Estate / Vacation Homes        Click Here To See The RV's / Camper Page

 

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